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1950s grain elevator in Rockwell City will come down

Landus Co-op decision will allow airport runway expansion

-Messenger photo by Chad Thompson
A grain elevator located on the property of Landus Cooperative, 529 Third St., in Rockwell City, will be demolished by the end of the year.

ROCKWELL CITY — A grain elevator that was built in the 1950s will be razed this year on the property of Landus Cooperative, 529 Third St. in Rockwell City.

Demolition of the elevator will benefit the city’s airport, according to Greg Broussard, a professional engineer with Boleten and Menk, of Ames. Broussard is the project engineer.

He said the project has been in the works for the past couple of years.

“What really drove this to happen was the airport,” Broussard said prior to the City Council meeting Monday night. “It will allow the airport to get about 1,200 foot of runway back.”

During the meeting, city officials awarded a contract for the demolition of the 175-foot-tall structure.

-Messenger photo by Chad Thompson
Demolition on this grain elevator in Rockwell City is anticipated to begin in the coming months.

DW Zinser Co., of Walford, submitted the low bid of $343,335 and was awarded the contract.

Five other firms submitted bids:

• Terminal Solutions, of Radcliffe, $397,000;

• Veit and Co., of Rogers, Minnesota, $459,950;

• Peterson Contractors Inc., of Reinbeck, $483,872.50;

• Rachel Contracting, of St. Michael, Minnesota, $518,960;

• Frattalone Co., of Little Canada, Minnesota, $594,560;

The engineer’s estimate was $390,000.

The city was recently awarded a grant by the Iowa Department of Transportation, which will help fund the project.

According to Kelly Smidt, city clerk, the DOT will cover 69 percent of the project, up to $300,000.

The remaining 31 percent of the cost will be covered by Landus.

“This is at no cost to the city,” Broussard said.

The elevator contains 12 separate bins, according to Broussard.

He said asbestos within the structure will need to be properly mitigated before the demolition can begin.

Broussard anticipates the work beginning in September, with a tentative completion date scheduled for Dec. 31.