Mainero: Harvest any field?

Argentinian machine designed for commercial-sized work

-Photo by Larry Kershner

Craig Yeager, a salesman for GBC
Distributing, points out the conical underbelly of the snoots on this Mainero MDD-100 corn head allows a combine operator to harvest in any corn field regardless of row width and direction.

-Photo by Larry Kershner Craig Yeager, a salesman for GBC Distributing, points out the conical underbelly of the snoots on this Mainero MDD-100 corn head allows a combine operator to harvest in any corn field regardless of row width and direction.

DES MOINES — The design is simple. It makes one wonder why it wasn’t thought of before — to harvest any corn field, any row width, in any direction, with the same corn head.

GBC Distributing, based in Canada, introduced the corn head at the Iowa Power Farming Show in Des Moines.

What allows the head to move seemingly effortlessly through any field in any direction with destroying stalks and losing ears is the design of the snoots.

On other snoots the underside is flat. The Mainero corn head snoots have a conical design underneath.

According to Craig Yeager, a salesman for GBC, the cone-shape gently pulls a corn stalk toward the gathering chains. Other designs, when going off alignment in a field, would break off the stalks and likely lose the ears.

-Photo by Larry Kershner

The Mainero corn head is built to stand up to long hours in large fields. Sprockets, the take-up chain and other moving parts are built heavy-duty. The snoots are made of stainless steel, rather than fiberglass, so they last long when running out of row alignment through a corn field.

-Photo by Larry Kershner The Mainero corn head is built to stand up to long hours in large fields. Sprockets, the take-up chain and other moving parts are built heavy-duty. The snoots are made of stainless steel, rather than fiberglass, so they last long when running out of row alignment through a corn field.

The conical snoots gradually lean a corn stalk into the gathering chains, which grabs the stalk and cuts it off.

The design will lose fewer corn ears, Yeager said.

Yeager said the design comes out of Argentina.

Because Argentina has huge acres of corn to work long seasons, all the MDD-100’s moving parts are heavy-duty.

Because the snoots are made of stainless steel, rather than fiberglass, they will not wear out as quickly when going off-alignment in a field, Yeager said.

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