Farm News Ag Show set for Dec. 6-7

More than 70 exhibitors await 2017’s attendees

-Messenger file photo by Joe Sutter

Sam morris, 3, of Manson, had fun watching Curt Roberts make pancakes with his dad Dave Morris at last year’s Farm News Ag Show.

-Messenger file photo by Joe Sutter
Sam morris, 3, of Manson, had fun watching Curt Roberts make pancakes with his dad Dave Morris at last year’s Farm News Ag Show.

Farm News is hosting its 16th annual Ag Show from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Dec. 6 and from 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Dec. 7 at the Iowa Central Community College East Campus, 2031 Quail Ave., Fort Dodge.

This location formerly housed Smithway Motor Xpress on the east side of Fort Dodge.

More than 30,000 square feet of exhibitor space and exhibitors from Iowa and surrounding states will showcase their latest state-of-the-art technology in grain products, equipment, ag services, seed varieties and toy farm buildings.

Parking is free, and there is no admission charge to the show.

Those attending the show can register to win a Kubota, two-piece, 19-drawer toolbox, valued at more than $2,300. The toolbox is provided by R & J Material Handling, Fort Dodge and Farm News.

Water will be served during the speaker presentations courtesy of Blue Ribbon Pelham Waters, of Fort Dodge.

Lunch is available on site by the Webster County Pork Producers from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. on Wednesday and by the Webster County Beef Producers from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. on Thursday.

Meals will be served by the Greater Fort Dodge Growth Alliance Ambassadors with the help of Iowa Central Community College agricultural students.

There will be a free pancake breakfast for the first 525 guests from 7:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. on Thursday.

The breakfast is catered by Chris Cakes and is sponsored by the Webster County Farm Bureau.

Farm News Ag Show partners include Iowa Central Community College, Webster County Farm Bureau, R & J Material Handling, United Bank of Iowa / Fort Dodge, Farm Credit Services of America, Webster City, John Pitzer Sales, The Country Store, Greater Fort Dodge Growth Alliance, Blue Ribbon Pelham Waters, Webster County ISU Extension, Webster County Pork Producers and the Webster County Beef Producers.

For more information, contact Dana Lantz, advertising manager, Farm News, 713 Central Ave., Fort Dodge, IA 50501 or dlantz@farm-news.com, (515) 574-4451, or (800) 622-6613, ext. 450.

FarmHer president, founder a featured speaker

Marji Guyler-Alaniz, president and founder of FarmHer, will be speaking at the Farm News Ag Show on Wednesday, Dec. 6 at 2:30 p.m. with her presentation on “Shining a Light on Women in Agriculture.”

Alaniz is a lifetime Iowan and lover of photography. That love, combined with graphic design, journalism and photography degrees from Grand View University, a Master’s of Business Administration from Drake University and an 11-year career in corporate agriculture working for a crop insurance company led her to launch FarmHer in the spring of 2013.

Through FarmHer, she is updating the image of agriculture by showing the female side of farming and ranching, creating community amongst women in agriculture and outreach to young women interested in agriculture. In addition to the photography side of FarmHer, Alaniz has expanded the business to include an online community for women in agriculture, a weekly award-winning television show, airing on national cable network RFD-TV called “FarmHer,” annual events to inspire and inform young women about agriculture and a line of merchandise aimed at women in agriculture. Her work for FarmHer has been featured in an expanse of arenas ranging from public television and RFD-TV to USDA’s National Ag Day Celebration and “O, the Oprah Magazine.”

About FarmHer

Women have always been an important but mostly unseen aspect of agriculture. In recent years, women are rising to the forefront of agriculture in so many ways; as owners/operators, landowners, workers, mentors and much more.

FarmHer was founded in 2013 to begin to change the image of agriculture — to include women in that image through photographs and stories. It quickly became clear that women in agriculture not only appreciated FarmHer, but they needed it, and they asked for more.

Today, FarmHer has grown into not just a gallery of images that are changing the way people perceive a farmer or rancher, but also into an online community of women in agriculture, events for these women and a national cable television show, airing weekly on RFD-TV, featuring FarmHers across the country.

Also speaking

Kelvin Leibold, farm and ag business management specialist at Iowa State University Extension and Outreach, will be the first speaker of the Farm News Ag Show scheduled for 9 a.m., Wednesday, Dec. 6, presenting “Global Agriculture: What’s Happening Next?”

Leibold has 30 years of experience with ISU Extension. His areas of expertise include farm management, farmland and building leasing, global agriculture, land values, farm machinery management, estate planning, intergenerational transfer and beginning farmers.

He is a member of the Annie’s Project national leadership team and has observed agriculture in Brazil, China, India, Nigeria, Paraguay, Russia, South Africa, Thailand and western Europe.

This included setting up a pork genetics project in Nigeria and ongoing work with Agri-Benchmark from Germany. Leibold has presented at the AGRITECHNICA machinery show in Germany, as well as many of the countries he has traveled to.

Leibold has a bachelor of science and master of science in agricultural education from Iowa State University.

Ernie Goss is the MacAllister Chair and professor of economics at Creighton University in Omaha, Nebraska, and director of the Goss Institute in Denver, Colorado. He is also a research faculty member at California State University — Fresno.

Goss will speak at 1 p.m. on Wednesday, Dec. 6 presenting “The Farm Economy, Exports and Federal Reserve Policies: The Outlook Based on Rural Bank CEOs.”

Goss was a visiting scholar with the Congressional Budget Office and the National Aeronautics & Space Administration. His book, “Changing Attitudes Toward Economic Reform During the Yeltsin Era,” was published by Praeger Press in 2003, and his book, “Governing Fortune: Casino Gambling in America,” was published by the University of Michigan Press in 2007.

He is editor of “Economic Trends,” an economics newsletter published monthly that is distributed to more than 10,000 subscribers. He is the past president of the Omaha Association of Business Economics, and the National Purchasing Management Association — Nebraska.

To gauge regional economic conditions, Goss conducts a monthly survey of bank chief executive officers in rural areas of 10 states and a monthly survey of supply managers in 12 states. Results from the two surveys are carried in more than 100 newspapers, 50 to 100 radio stations and scores of other media outlets each month.

Recent citations appeared in the Wall Street Journal, Business Week, Forbes, and The Economist, as well as regional newspapers such as the Denver Post, the Kansas City Star, and the Minneapolis Pioneer Press. Recently, Goss has appeared on CNN, Fox Business News, National Public Television and the BBC.

David Kruse is president of CommStock Investments, a northwest Iowa agricultural risk management company that provides an umbrella of services. They include commodity market brokerage and commodity market advisory services, crop insurance through Agrivantage LLC, farm management services through Pro-Crop LLC and a managed bushels grain marketing program through Agri-Plus LLC. Kruse also owns Royalty Insurance LLC, which is a property/casualty insurance company. In 2004, Kruse founded Brazil Iowa Farms, LLC, a group of nearly 320 investors that invested in Brazilian farmland and exited their investment there in 2015.

During those years, Kruse made many trips to Brazil, giving him a great deal of personal experience observing the competitive role that Brazil plays in the global market. Kruse has also traveled to Argentina, Chile and South Africa, gaining a larger perspective of global agriculture.

For more than 30 years, he has produced “The CommStock Report,” an opinionated ag commentary and market analysis available daily on many radio stations covering the greater Midwest. “The CommStock Report” has also been delivered electronically by subscription on DTN/FarmDayta and the internet since 1985 to thousands of subscribers across the U.S. and Canada. Additionally, “The CommStock Report” is a regular feature of many Midwestern newspapers.

“The CommStock Report,” called the “Mark Twain of the Plains” for its writing style, is especially noted for its colorful, opinionated commentary and perspective from rural America, advocating farm community interests and traditional farm values.

Kruse has been actively engaged in production agriculture since 1973. He continues to manage his family’s corn/soybean farm in northwest Iowa. He has also been an outspoken proponent of ethanol and has used his market advisory service as a platform to advocate for the biofuel industry.

At the Farm News Ag Show, Kruse will be speaking at 10:30 a.m., on Thursday, Dec. 7 with his presentation on “When Persistence Pays — It’s Time to Get Stubborn.”

Matt Helmers is the dean’s professor in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and professor in the Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering at Iowa State University, where he has been on the faculty since 2003.

Helmers will be discussing “Iowa Nutrient Reduction Strategy: What Practices and How Much,” at the Farm News Ag Show on Wednesday, Dec. 6 at 10:30 a.m.

Helmers’ research areas include studies on the impact of nutrient management, cropping practices, drainage design and management, and strategic placement of buffer systems on nutrient export from agricultural landscapes. He has a regional Iowa State University Extension program working to increase adoption of practices that have the potential to reduce downstream nutrient export. He served as the nitrogen science team lead on the Iowa Nutrient Reduction Strategy Science Assessment.

Dr. S. Elwynn Taylor, Iowa State University Extension and Outreach meteorologist, is a frequent guest speaker to the Farm News Ag Show.

Taylor will present “Weather Outlook 2018,” on Thursday, Dec. 7 at 8:30 a.m.

He is well-known for his analysis of weather influence on the Midwest. He is widely recognized for his clear explanations of the complexities of long-term weather variability.

Before moving to Iowa in 1979, he was a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Alabama. He was educated in botany at Utah State University and completed his doctoral studies at Washington University in St. Louis in 1970.

He has published more than 200 articles reporting his research on the impacts of weather conditions. His voice is well-known from his regular Midwest radio broadcasts of crop weather and other educational information. His explanations of global warming, ozone depletion, El Nino, and other weather events and how they impact life and our economy are clear, insightful and concise.

All persons concerned with climate-associated risks will benefit from Taylor’s clear and often humorous explanations.

Dr. S. Elwynn Taylor, Iowa State University Extension and Outreach meteorologist, is a frequent guest speaker to the Farm News Ag Show.

Taylor will present “Weather Outlook 2018,” on Thursday, Dec. 7 at 8:30 a.m.

He is well-known for his analysis of weather influence on the Midwest. He is widely recognized for his clear explanations of the complexities of long-term weather variability.

Before moving to Iowa in 1979, he was a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Alabama. He was educated in botany at Utah State University and completed his doctoral studies at Washington University in St. Louis in 1970.

He has published more than 200 articles reporting his research on the impacts of weather conditions. His voice is well-known from his regular Midwest radio broadcasts of crop weather and other educational information. His explanations of global warming, ozone depletion, El Nino, and other weather events and how they impact life and our economy are clear, insightful and concise.

All persons concerned with climate-associated risks will benefit from Taylor’s clear and often humorous explanations.

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